Grasping?

If we grasp too tightly we just might leave a mark and the mark we leave behind may be more than just our fingerprints, it might be our freedom.

Grasping is a form of emotional masochism. The dictionary’s definition of emotional masochism says that I find some strange or subtle pleasure in the act. At the moment, I don’t feel a sense of “pleasure” in the process, well at least none that I recall as I ponder this definition. As I read a little further it says the act may involve a sense of familiarity or self-justification. Bingo! Now, this sounds familiar, ha. In hindsight, there has not been a time where I experienced lasting happiness while grasping at anything, in fact, it was just the opposite. Grasping only led to physical and emotional pain and yet I seem to be drawn to the payoff of this Bingo game of familiarity and or self-justification because I keep playing. Grasping resembles a vampire, it will eventually suck the life out of you.

Do you know how they catch monkey’s in other countries? They dig a hole and fill it with peanuts or a banana. The hole is big enough for a monkey to insert his empty hand but once he grabs the food he is unable to release his hand from the trap because he refuses to let go of his bonanza.

How often do we cling to things thinking it will be the one thing that will make us happy? If we let go of our grip we can enjoy what we have, our freedom to make a wiser decision. 

Today I get to practice not getting myself stuck in the trap of short term happiness. Wish me luck. I am trying not to justify why I feel the need to consume the entire bag of mini dark chocolate bars in the fridge when I already had one.

Day # 18 I Get To versus I Have To

 

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I have to go to work.  I have to clean up my plate. I have to make good choices.

For many years, I thought this was how I was supposed to show up in the world. I didn’t know it was a choice.

When I discovered it was a choice, it changed my perspective from an obligation to a blessing.

I get to choose to eat healthily.  I get to choose to love what I do. I get to choose to make good choices.

When I choose how I will live my life,  life feels like an adventure, not a prison.

 

 

Practicing Non-Attachment

 

 

 

Two months ago, I asked a Buddhist nun, why she shaved her head.  She said it helps us to let go of attachment.

For last two months, I have thought about this practice.  It was not easy to make this decision to shave my head.  Although, I knew it would be a great learning experience toward the practice of letting go of attachment.

Having an attachment to your life creates unnecessary suffering.

We have an attachment to the food we eat, the love we share, the gifts we give, the conversations we have with others, the day we wake up to, the children we raise and the kind of car we drive. We have an attachment to whether we live or die, the sun shines, the wind blows, our child gets a part in the school play, how our hair looks and who’s on first and what’s on second.

You can set an intention and you can have a dream. The key is not to be attached.

Life often shows up differently than we envisioned or planned.  A practice of letting go of our grip on the reins of our life,  and let life unfold as it will, enables us to live without limiting the love we have to share